Roxane Berger Designs | About
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About

ROXANE BERGER

Roxane received her BA and MA in Studio Arts from CSUN. She is a C.I.D. (Certified Interior Designer) who educates you through the process. She is an adjunct professor at California State University, Northridge, teaching lighting and other interior design courses.

Thoughts about Interior Design

Roxane’s interest in her client’s preferences for day to day living, entertaining and work means she will partner with you to create interior spaces that go far beyond the ordinary. Custom design of millwork, furniture,stone and masonry reflect the aesthetic of her clients and will be impeccably detailed.

Her art background and expertise in lighting design ensures that your project will look beautiful day or night, incorporating daylight and control systems. Her clients will have the ability to have different mood and task settings in the way they wish to control the lighting design. See more of her work at Topanga Architecture & Design.

Thoughts about Lighting Design

We live in exciting times for lighting design. With new energy saving technologies we are able to design spaces to have different mood settings. Your rooms can do “double duty” – bright and conducive for working on a hobby or warm and inviting for conversations. Light is an element of art and we can employ its use to enhance color, texture and form of architecture.

See more of her work at Topanga Architecture & Design.

Themes in Her Art

Camouflage

Camouflage in nature is what allows some things to become invisible while being present, the green grasshopper in leaves, the zebra in grasslands versus red apples on a green leafy tree or stars at night. Seen in different contexts the start at day are invisible, the green grasshopper on a parched piece of grass pops into our vision with attention. Why we are wired to see some things and are virtually blind to other is intriguing. Creating these patterns is an exploration of what we see and what we do not see. Interspersed are representational images that allude to subliminal messages that are present in our modern civilized lives that we take for granted.

Shape of Space & Abstraction

My paintings employ the use of elements and principles of design to capture attention but not for a literal translation of the object or scene. Science has fueled my imagination and inspired my painting but they are not seeking scientific proof. I’ve seen cellular structures through microscopes and looked through telescopes to see planets and stars. In my imagination and in my paintings, these images become bigger, brighter and more colorful than what I have seen through those instruments. The imagery in my paintings suggests energy waves of radio, cell phone, television and microwaves, as well as chemical responses within cellular organisms. At times the images are in the background like a frequency of white noise; in other paintings a solar flare up, or an atmospheric disturbance or the constant barrage of messages we willingly put in front ourselves on the screens from cell phones to movie screens that command attention. Each platform has limitations and our focus is constantly changing. It is the tension of what is outside our self and what is inside that I want to see. How do we decide to put something in the forefront or push it to the background?

Flight/Motion or Movement

To feel the wind on my skin, to float in water and earth beneath my feet give me gratitude of my human experience but to escape the earth in flight is the ultimate freedom of my mind. The plane is the icon for these fantasies to view existence from a different point of view – from above looking down and to catch myself looking up.

Mindscapes

I have used architectural references to house feelings for the past and present. When I moved from West Hollywood to Topanga many people asked me what I felt and these paintings are a response to that question.

roxane berger